Configuring Virtual Wire Features > Building a Virtual Wire Fabric
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Building a Virtual Wire Fabric
Multiple Virtual Wire switches can be interconnected to form a single Virtual Wire fabric. A Virtual Wire fabric is like a highly scalable and distributed patch panel that can be dynamically and remotely provisioned to implement single dedicated wire speed links between any two device ports in the network.
When all of the switches in the Virtual Wire fabric are part of the same Management Fabric, they can be provisioned and controlled as a single logical Virtual Wire switch.
 
Informational Note: A Management Fabric for more than four Virtual Wire switches requires a software license that is already included on E68-M and E28-Q switches.
The most efficient design for a Virtual Wire fabric is based on the classic leaf-spine architecture, or Clos, a nonblocking, multistage switching topology, as in Figure 4
Figure 4: Leaf and Spine Topology for Virtual Wire Fabric.
 
Informational Note: In Clos architecture, there is no limit to the number of Virtual Wire links between device ports that are physically connected to the same leaf. Instead, the number of Virtual Wire links between device ports that are connected to different leafs depend on the oversubscription ratio between leaf and spine.
With this approach, you can select the desired oversubscription ratio and build a modular and scalable architecture to scale up to thousands of device ports. For example, using E68-M switches as building blocks, a possible leaf switch configuration uses 44 x 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports to connect to device ports and 24 x 10 Gigabit Ethernet ports to connect to the spine layer, resulting in a 1.8:1 oversubscription ratio. Based on the desired maximum number of device ports, you can select from different scale options:
Figure 5: 17 Leafs and 6 Spines
17 leaf 6 spine at 1.8:1 oversubscription ratio for a total of 748 device 10 Gbps/1Gbps ports
Figure 6: 34 Leafs and 12 Spines
34 leaf 12 spine at 1.8:1 oversubscription ratio for a total of 1496 device 10Gbps/1Gbps ports
Figure 7: 68 Leafs and 24 Spines
68 leaf 24 spine at 1.8:1 oversubscription ratio for a total of 2992 device 10Gbps/1Gbps ports