Configuring Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol


Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) is an election protocol that enables virtual routing functions for a master or standby routing infrastructure for a given IP address. A virtual router is defined by a virtual router identifier (VRID) and a virtual router IP address (VIP). The scope of the virtual routers is restricted to a single VLAN.


VRRP provides information on the state of a virtual router, not the routes processed and exchanged by the router. It increases the availability and reliability of routing paths by automatic gateway selections on an IP sub-network.


VRRP provides rapid transition from master to standby and from standby to master. The master router sends advertisements every second.


If the master VRRP advertisements are not received within a window of time, three (3) seconds, then the standby virtual router becomes the master virtual router and begins performing routing for the virtual router. If the master router becomes active again, it can become the master again or allow the standby to continue as the master router. The role depends on the value assigned to VRRP priority.


vRouter interfaces now support both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. 

 

Configuring VRRP Priority


The Priority is a value used by the VRRP router for master election. The valid priority range for a virtual router is from 1 to 254. 1 is the lowest priority and 254 is the highest priority. The default value for standby routers is 100. Higher values indicate higher priority for the virtual router.


Configuring the VRRP ID


The Virtual Router Identifier is a configurable value between 1 and 255. There is no default value.


Example Configuration


In this example, you have the following configurations on two switches (SW1 and SW2) on the network:


  • VLAN 100 with IP address range 192.168.11.0/24
  • VNET with the name vrrp-router and scope fabric



  1. On SW1, configure a vRouter:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-create name vrrp-rtr1 vnet vrrp-router router-type hardware enable


  1. Add the first vRouter interface:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-add vrouter-name vrrp-rtr1 ip 192.168.11.3 netmask 24 vlan 100 if data


  1. Use the vrouter-interface-show command to see the name of the interface:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-show format all layout vertical


vrouter-name: vrrp-rtr1

nic: eth0.100

ip: 192.168.11.3/24

assignment: static

mac: 66:0e:94:dd:18:c4

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: up

 

  1. Create the VRRP interface:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-add vrouter-name vrrp-rtr1 ip 192.168.11.2 netmask 24 vlan 100 if data vrrp-id 10 vrrp-primary eth0.100 vrrp-priority 100


  1. Create the vRouter and interfaces on SW2:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-create name vrrp-rtr2 vnet vrrp-router router-type hardware dedicated-vnet-service


  1. Add the vRouter interface:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-add vrouter-name vrrp-rtr2 ip 192.168.11.4 netmask 24 vlan 100 if data


  1. Use the vrouter-interface-show command to see the name of the interface:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-show format all layout vertical


vrouter-name: vrrp-router2

nic: eth2.100

ip: 192.168.11.3/24

assignment: static

mac: 66:0e:94:21:a9:6c

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: up

 

  1. Create the VRRP interface:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-add vrouter-name vrrp-rtr2 ip 192.168.11.2 netmask 24 vlan 100 if data vrrp-id 10 vrrp-primary eth0.100 vrrp-priority 50


  1. Display the information about the VRRP setup:


CLI (network-admin@switch) > vrouter-interface-show format all layout vertical


vrouter-name: vrrp-router1

nic: eth0.100

ip: 192.168.11.3/24

assignment: static

mac: 66:0e:94:dd:18:c4

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: up

vrouter-name: vrrp-router1

nic: eth1.100

ip: 192.168.11.2/24

assignment: static

mac: 00:00:5e:00:01:0a

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: up

vrrp-id: 10

vrrp-primary: eth1.100

vrrp-priority: 100

vrrp-state: master

vrouter-name: vrrp-router2

nic: eth3.100

ip: 192.168.11.4/24

assignment: static

mac: 66:0e:94:21:54:07

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: up

vrouter-name: vrrp-router2

nic: eth3.100

ip: 192.168.11.2/24

assignment: static

mac: 00:00:5e:00:01:0a

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: down

Pluribus Networks Configuration Guide

pluribusnetworks.com 87

vrrp-id: 10

vrrp-primary: eth3.100

vrrp-priority: 50

vrrp-state: slave

 

When you intentionally disable the VRRP interface, the slave interface becomes the master interface:


vrouter-name: vrrp-router2

nic: eth3.100

ip: 192.168.11.1/24

assignment: static

mac: 00:00:5e:00:01:0a

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: up

vrrp-id: 10

vrrp-primary: eth3.100

vrrp-priority: 50

vrrp-state: master

 

When you re-enable the VRRP interface, it becomes the master again, and the second interface returns to the slave:


vrouter-name: vrrp-router2

nic: eth3.100

ip: 192.168.11.2/24

assignment: static

mac: 00:00:5e:00:01:0a

vlan: 100

vxlan: 0

if: data

alias-on:

exclusive: no

nic-config: enable

nic-state: down

vrrp-id: 10

vrrp-primary: eth3.100

vrrp-priority: 50

vrrp-state: slave