Using Application Flows and Statistics
Displaying Standard Statistics
You can display standard statistics that consist of flow-based information collected and tracked continuously by the switch.
To show connection-level statistics, traffic flows between a pair of hosts for an application service, including current connections and all connections since the creation of the fabric, enter the following CLI command at the prompt:
CLI network-admin@switch > connection-stats-show
switch: pleiades24
mac: 00:e0:81:e4:02:12
vlan: 200
ip: 100.200.1.3
port: 53
iconns: 80
oconns: 0
ibytes: 0
obytes: 0
total-bytes: 0
last-seen-ago: 4d19h32m23s
switch: pleiades24
mac: 00:12:c0:80:1e:85
vlan: 200
ip: 100.200.1.4
port: 16
iconns: 0
oconns: 70684
ibytes: 578M
obytes: 890M
total-bytes: 1.43G
last-seen-ago: 46s
 
From the information displayed in the output, you can see statistics for each switch, VLANs, client and server IP addresses, as well as the services on each connection. Netvisor displays latency and other information.
The latency (us) column displays the running latency measurement for the TCP connection in microseconds. The column indicates end-to-end latency and includes the protocol stack processing for the connected hosts and all intermediary network hops.
This is not the same latency measurement experience by a packet transiting the switch port-to-port. The port-to-port latency is platform-dependent and you should refer to the datasheet for your switch model.
To display specific types of connections, use the additional parameters with the command. For instance to display VLANs of connections,
 
CLI network-admin@switch > connection-stats-show vlan
switch   vlan vxlan client-ip   server-ip     service      active   age
-------- ---- -----  ---------   ---------     -------      ------   ---
switch12 1    0       10.9.10.152 96.17.77.96   http        yes      35m27s
switch12 5    0       10.12.1.47  10.9.10.204   445         yes      7m56s
switch12 1    0       10.9.9.21   23.62.97.88   http        yes      3m41s
switch12 1    0       10.9.9.21   23.60.129.224 http        yes      3m44s
switch12 1    0       10.9.10.72  10.9.99.23    http        yes      7s
. . .
 
To display a summary of traffic statistics for each application service, use the service-stats-show command.
CLI network-admin@switch > service-stats-show
switch         service         bytes
------         -------         -----
pleiades24     53495           584
pleiades24     8084            845M
pleiades24     59475           33.9K
pleiades24     imap            1.83M
pleiades24     35356           106
pleiades24     54341           584
 
From the information displayed in the output, you can review each switch, service, and the number of bytes used by each service.
 
Understanding vFlow Statistics
The virtual network-based flows- vflows, display statistics for packet traffic flows on a switch and across the fabric. The vFlows are very powerful and provide many features such as quality of service (QoS), traffic shaping, packet redirect, drop actions, mirror, and capture.
A vFlow can be configured to store log statistics to a file accessible to clients using NFS and SFTP. If statistics logging is enabled, Netvisor ONE periodically polls the switch for the most recent statistics for each flow and saves the statistics to an exported file. Netvisor ONE also saves individual statistics received from other switches in the fabric and combines the statistics from all switches to record aggregate statistics for the entire fabric.
The switch consists of two components, the switch and the server. vFlows with operations such as drop executes within the switch component. Some vFlows operations for QoS take place in the switch component, while others operate within the co-processor by directing pertinent traffic to the co-processor.
There, the traffic is managed and then sent back to the switch component.Other actions such as copy-to-cpu sends the match traffic to the server component where the traffic is managed and then forwards packets for delivery. In general, the details are managed by Netvisor ONE including fabric scope commands that cause all switches within a fabric to participate in an operation and then sends the compiled results to the CLI or to log files.
Before you can access the files, you must enable NFS or SFTP access to the log files by using the admin-service-modify command.
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-share-show
 
switch     vnet
------ ----
enable
------
share-path
----------
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24:///fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
no pleiades24://fab1-global
 
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-share-modify fab1-global enable
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-share-show
 
switch     vnet
------     -----
enable
------
share-path
----------
pleiades24 fab1-global
yes
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
yes
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24://fab1-global
pleiades24 fab1-global
no
pleiades24://fab1-global
 
 
You can then access the statistics log files using NFS in the following locations:
For the switch scope, the files are located in
/net/switch-name//-name/flow/flow-name/switch/
switch-name/stats
 
For the fabric scope, the files are located in
/net/switch-name//-name/flow/flow-name/fabric/
stats
 
To create a vFLow for example, Host-Agent-Discover, and measure statistics, enter the following command:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name Host-Agent-Discover scope local system
To view all vFlows currently tracked by the switch or fabric, use the vflow-show command:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-show
switch: pleiades24
name: Host-Agent-Discover
scope: local
type: system
dst-ip: 224.4.9.6
precedence: 2
action: copy-to-cpu
switch:           pleiades24
name: DHCP-client
scope: local
type: system
in-port: 1-68
src-port: 68
proto: udp
precedence: 2
action: copy-to-cpu
switch:           pleiades24
name: Host-Agent-Discover
scope: local
type: system
dst-ip: 224.4.9.6
precedence: 2
action: copy-to-cpu
switch:           pleiades24
name: DHCP-client
scope: local
type: system
in-port: 1-68
src-port: 68
proto: udp
precedence: 2
action: copy-to-cpu
 
From the information displayed in the output, you can review the switch, the name of the vFlow, scope, type of vFlow, destination IP address, precedence, and action for the vFlow.
To display statistics for all vFlows, use the vflow-stats-show command:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-stats-show
switch     name          packets   bytes    cpu-packets    cpu-bytes
------     ----          -------   -----    -----------    ---------
pleiades24IGMP-Flow      368K      23.0M    392K           23.0M
pleiades24 LLDP-Flow     82.9K     26.3M    82.9K          26.0M
pleiades24 Host-Agent    17.8K     1.11M    0              0
pleiades24 ECP           0         0        0              0
 
To monitor statistics of a vFlow and update every 10 seconds, use the following syntax:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-stats-show name flow1 show-diff-interval 10
 
To log persistent records of flow statistics, use the logging parameter and collect statistics every 10 seconds:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name monitor-flow scope local ether-type arp stats log stats-interval 5
You can display the statistics logs for the new flow using the vflow-stats-show command.
 
* 
Informational Note: Conflicting vFlows
Multiple vFlows can be active at once, but cannot apply them at the same time. You can use the precedence parameter to set the order of the vFlows. If you set the precedence to a higher value (0 - 10 with 0 as the lowest precedence), the vFlow has a higher precedence than those with lower values. If you are seeing error messages about vFlow conflicts, try adding a precedence value to new or existing vFlows.
Creating vFlows with the Scope Fabric
To create vFlows across the entire fabric, configure the vFlow with the scope fabric and stats enable option. Using these parameters enables statistics for the flow on all switches that are members of the fabric and you can display the statistics for any switch in the fabric.
To create a vFlow for VLAN1 with the scope fabric, use the following syntax:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name fab_flow1 scope fabric stats enable vlan 1
To display the statistics for the new vFlow for a switch in the fabric, use the following syntax:
CLI network-admin@switch > switch switch-name vflow-stats-show name fab_flow1
name      packets      bytes  cpu-packets  cpu-bytes
----      -------      -----  -----------  ---------
fab_flow1 51.4K        13.8M  50.1K        13.1M
 
If you omit the switch name, all vFlow statistics for the fabric are displayed.
switch    name      packets bytes cpu-packets cpu-bytes
------    ----      ------- ----- ----------- ---------
pleiades1 fab_flow1 1.32K   305K  1.29K       291K
pleiades2 fab_flow1 910     256K  884         243K
 
Example Use Cases for vFlows
The following examples illustrate how to use vFlows to impact traffic on the switch. You can regulate bandwidth, create multiple vFlows, or share bandwidth.
Creating Multiple vFlows
1. You can create multiple vFlows and add precedence values to the vFlows. The packet is matched to the vFlow with the highest precedence. Create the first vFlow:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name client-flow1 scope fabric bw flow-class meter bw-max 2g
2. Create the second vFlow:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name client-flow2 scope fabric bw flow-class meter bw-max 5g src-ip 192.168.20.1
vflow-create: Flow conflicts with Flow client-flow1, ID68: specify fields to make flows mutually exclusive or change the flow precedence
 
The error message is generated because the vFlow configurations conflict with each other. To differentiate between the two flows, assign a different precedence to client-flow2:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name client-flow2 scope fabric bw flow-class meter bw-max 5g src-ip 192.168.20.1 precedence 5
Configuring Bandwidth Sharing for a Single VLAN
In some instances, you may want to configure bandwidth sharing for a single VLAN with different IP addresses or subnets. To do this, you must create a VRG with the required bandwidth:
CLI network-admin@switch > vrg-create name admin-vrg vlans 100 data-bw-min 1g data-bw-max 2g scope fabric
You have now created a VRG with the guaranteed bandwidth of 1 Gbps and limited to a maximum of 2 Gbps. Now, create a vFLow for each IP address:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name vfl-1 scope fabric vlan 100 src-ip 1.1.1.1
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name vfl-2 scope fabric vlan 100 src-ip 2.2.2.2
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name vfl-3 scope fabric vlan 100 src-ip 3.3.3.3
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name vfl-4 scope fabric vlan 100 src-ip 4.4.4.4
In this example, the specified IP addresses each have a guaranteed bandwidth between 1 Gbps and 2 Gbps.
If you want to specify a subnet, 100.100.100.0/28, and VLAN 53 with maximum bandwidth of 50 Mbps, use the following syntax:
CLI network-admin@switch > vrg-create name vrg-custom scope fabric data-bw-min 50M data-bw-max 50M vlan 53
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name vfl-cust scope fabric src-ip 100.100.100.0 src-ip-mask 255.255.255.240 vlan 53
But later on, you found that sixteen IP addresses were not enough and you needed an additional 8 with the subnet, 101.101.101.8/29 that require the same bandwidth as the previous subnet. Use the following syntax:
CLI network-admin@switch > vflow-create name vfl-cust-2 scope fabric src-ip 101.101.101.8 src-ip-mask 255.255.255.248 vlan 53
You now have two vFlows on VLAN 53.
Then, you discover that 50 Mbps is not sufficient to support the network traffic affected by the vFlow, and you want to upgrade to 80 Mbps:
CLI network-admin@switch > vrg-modify name vrg-custom data-bw-min 80M data-bw-max 80M
Configuring vFlows in Virtual Wire Mode
vFlows can be configured on Virtual Wire platforms. You can configure a vFLow to store log statistics to a file accessible to clients using NFS and SFTP. If you enable statistics logging, Netvisor ONE periodically polls the switch for the most recent statistics for each flow and saves the statistics to an exported file. Netvisor ONE also saves individual statistics received from other switches in the fabric and combines the statistics from all switches to record aggregate statistics for the entire fabric.
Support for TCP Parameters using vFlows
Packet Broker requires the ability to create flows based on TCP control bits in a packet. The commands, vflow-create and vflow-modify have a new option tcp-flags. The supported TCP control bits include FIN, SYN, RST, PUSH, ACK, and URG.
Setting the ACK bit is supported only if it is combined with other TCP bits such as SYN and FIN and not as a single parameter.
Netvisor ONE supports to-port and mirror actions for vFlow with tcp-flags filter. The actions added for vFlows with tcp-flags configured include mirror-to-port. Ifyou enable analytics, then Netvisor ONE applies copy-to-cpu n the same vFlow. Also, Netvisor ONE sets the flows d with a precedence of 3 or above. Netvisor ONE creates System vFlows with precedence 2 so that analytics can also work even with these vFlows.
To create a vFlow for the default system table, use the following syntax:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-create name Redirect-TCP-Reset tcp-flags RST action to-port
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-create name Redirect-TCP-ECN-Capable tcp-flags ECN,RST action to-port
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-create name Mirror-TCP-Finished tcp-flags FIN action mirror
 
You can use the vflow-table-show command to display vFlow tables:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)> vflow-table-show format all layout vertical
switch:          Spine1
name: Egress-Table-1-0
id: a0000d7:1
flow-max: 1024
flow-used: 0
flow-tbl-slices: 1
capability: match-metadata
flow-tbl-bank: Egress
flow-profile: system
switch:          Spine1
name: Decap-Table-1-0
id: a0000d7:2
flow-max: 1024
flow-used: 0
flow-tbl-slices: 2
capability: none
flow-tbl-bank: Match-Metadata
flow-profile: vxlan
switch: tac-f64-sw5
name: OpenFlow-L2-L3-1-0
id: a0000d7:3
flow-max: 1024
flow-used: 0
flow-tbl-slices: 7
capability: none
flow-tbl-bank: Match-Metadata
flow-profile: openflow
 
Configuring vFlows with User Defined Fields (UDFs)
A User Defined Field (UDF) can match up to 128 bytes of a packet starting from the first byte of the packet. The relative offset can be given to the match location. The length of the match can be from 1 to 4 bytes. Hardware with a Trident chip supports the creation of 8 UDF IDs. Each id can match a 2 byte portion of a packet. Creating a UDF with a length of 3 or 4 bytes requires 2 UDF IDs whereas a UDF with length of 1 or 2 bytes required 1 UDF id. The length specified for each UDF determines the total number of UDFs supported by Netvisor ONE. If you specify a length of 3 or 4 bytes, a maximum of 4 UDFs can be created. If you specify a length of 1 or 2 bytes, a maximum of 8 UDFs can be created.
A UDF adds a qualifier to the vFlow group, and you should create all UDFs before creating any vFlows.
This feature is disabled by default, and you must enable it using the following command:
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-settings-modify enable-user-defined-flow
You must reboot Netvisor ONE for the parameter to take effect on the platform.
To disable the feature, use the following command:
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-settings-modify no-user-defined-flow
A new command, udf-create, adds the qualifier to the UDF group in the hardware. This allocates UDF IDs based on the length. The command, vflow-create, also has new fields to provide the data and mask to be matched by the vFlow. You can create vFlows with either one or two UDFs.
You cannot modify a UDF after adding it to a vFlow. You must delete the vFlow, modify the UDF, and re-create the vFlow with the modified UDF.
 
New Commands for UDF
To create a new UDF, use the following command:
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>udf-create name u1 scope local offset 10 length 2 header packet-start
 
udf-create
Create the UDF qualifier list
name name-string
Create the UDF name
scope local|fabric
Scope for the UDF
offset number-bytes
The offset in bytes. This is a value between 1 and 128.
length number-bytes
The length in bytes. This is a value between 1 and 4 bytes.
header packet-start|l3-outer|l3-inner|l4-outer|l4-inner
 
The header from where offset is calculated.
To delete a UDF command,
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>udf-delete name u1
udf-delete
Delete UDF qualifier list
name name-string
The name of the UDF to delete.
To modify a UDF command,
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>udf-modify name u1 scope local offset 20 length 4 header packet-start
udf-modify
Modify UDF qualifier list
name name-string
The name of the UDF to modify.
one or more of the following options:
 
offset number-bytes
The offset in bytes. This is a value between 1 and 128.
length number-bytes
The length in bytes. This is a value between 1 and 4 bytes.
header packet-start|l3-outer|l3-inner|l4-outer|l4-inner
 
The header from where offset is calculated.
 
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>udf-show
switch name scope offset length header
------ ---- ----- ------ ------ ------------
k2 u1 local 20 4 packet-start
k2 u2 local 24 4 packet-start
 
udf-show
Displays the UDF qualifier list
name name-string
Displays the UDF name
scope local|fabric
Displays the scope for the UDF
offset number-bytes
Displays the offset in bytes. This is a value between 1 and 128.
length number-bytes
Displays the length in bytes. This is a value between 1 and 4 bytes.
header packet-start|l3-outer|l3-inner|l4-outer|l4-inner
 
Displays the header from where the offset is calculated.
 
The command, vflow-create, has the following new parameters:
udf-name1 udf-name
Specify the name of the UDF.
udf-data1 udf-data1-number
Specify UDF data1q with the format 0xa0a0a01
udf-data1-mask udf-data1-mask-number
Specify he mask for udf-data with the format 0xffffffff.
udf-name2 udf-name
Specify the name of the UDF.
udf-data2 udf-data2-number
Specify UDF data2 with the format 0xa0a0a01
udf-data2-mask udf-data2-mask-number
Specify the mask for udf-data with the format 0xffffffff.
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-create name vf scope local udf-name1 u1 udf-data 0x0a0a0a01 udf-data-mask1 0xffffffff udf-name2 u2 udf-data2 0x0a0a1400 udf-data-mask2 0xffffff00
CLI(network-admin@Spine1)>vflow-show
switch name scope type precedence udf-name1 udf-data1 udf-data-mask1
------ ---- ----- ----- ---------- --------- --------- --------------
K2 vf local vflow default u1 0xa0a0a01 0xffffffff
 
udf-name2 udf-data2 udf-data-mask2 enable
--------- --------- -------------- ------
u2        0xa0a1400 0xffffff00     enable
 
Configuring DSCP to CoS Mapping
Netvisor ONE supports creating Quality of Service (QoS) maps configuring hardware based mapping of Differentiated Services Code Point (DSCP) value in a received IP header to a Cost of Service (CoS) priority. This helps to prioritize traffic based on DSCP markings by using the appropriate egress CoS queues to send packets out.
Netvisor ONE sets the DSCP value to the 6 upper bits in the 8-bit ToS field of an IP header. Details about the specific values and the proposed traffic disposition can be found in these RFCs :
RFC 2474 (DS Fields Definitions)
RFC 2475 (DiffServ architecture)
RFC 2597 (AF PHB Group)
RFC 2780 (IANA Allocation Guidelines)
A quick summary of DSCP in Netvisor ONE:
DSCP values range from 0 to 63, while packet priorities map to 8 CoS values or priority queues.
Standards (IANA) include specific values in their guidelines. These values are used by different vendors to facilitate interconnectivity.
l Class selector code points (CS0 through CS7, multiples of 8) are backwards compatible with IP ToS values. These values also serve as base selectors for other values.
l Assured Forwarding (AF) code points have 4 priority classes, each class has three code points indicating the drop precedence.
Class1: AF11/12/13 (DSCP 10, 12, 14)
Class2: AF21/22/23 (DSCP 18, 20, 22)
Class3: AF31/32/33 (DSCP 26, 28, 30)
Class4: AF41/42/43 (DSCP 34, 36, 38
0 is best effort (CoS 0, default)
46 is an Expedited Forwarding (EF) code point, indicating critical traffic.
New commands support this feature:
CLI network-admin@switch > dscp-map-create
dscp-map-create
Create a DSCP priority mapping table with default DSCP to priority mappings.
name name-string
Create a name for the DSCP map
CLI network-admin@switch > dscp-map-delete
dscp-map-delete
Delete a DSCP priority mapping table.
name name-string
The name of the DSCP map to delete.
CLI network-admin@switch > dscp-map-show
dscp-map-show
Display a DSCP priority mapping table
name name-string
Display the name of the DSCP map.
This command displays output only if there are maps configured.
CLI network-admin@switch > dscp-map-pri-map-modify
dscp-map-pri-map-modify
Update priority mappings in tables.
dscp-map selector:
name name-string
Specify the name for the DSCP map to modify.
the following pri-map arguments:
pri number
Specify a CoS priority from 0 to 7.
dsmap number-list
Specify a DSCP value(s)as a single value, comma separated list, or a number range.
CLI network-admin@switch > dscp-map-pri-map-show
dscp-map-pri-map-show
Display priority mappings in tables.
dscp-map selector:
name name-string
Display the name of the DSCP map.
the following pri-map arguments:
pri number
Display a CoS priority from 0 to 7.
dsmap number-list
Display a DSCP value(s)a DSCP value(s)as a single value, comma separated list, or a number range.
The dscp-map-pri-map-show displays output only if there are maps configured.
The default values are listed in the following dscp-map-pri-map-show output:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)>dscp-map-pri-map-show name dscp-map1
switch name pri dsmap
------- ---- --- -----------
Spine1  ds2 0 none
Spine1  ds2 1 8,10,12,14
Spine1  ds2 2 16,18,20,22
Spine1  ds2 3 24,26,28,30
Spine1  ds2 4 32,34,36,38
Spine1  ds2 5 40
Spine1  ds2 6 48
Spine1  ds2 7 56
 
The command, port-config-modify, has a new parameter, dscp-map map-name|none to support this feature. Using the option none deletes or cancels a DSCP map previously configured on the port.
 
Configuring Priority-based Flow Control
*This feature is supported on the following platforms: S4048-ON, S6000-ON, AS5712-54X, AS6712-32X, F9272-X, and F9232-Q.
 
Priority Flow Control (PFC) is an IEEE standard (802.1qbb) for link level flow control on Ethernet networks. Functionally, this feature is similar to the IEEE standard 802.3 for PAUSE mechanism, except that it operates at the granularity of individual packet priorities or traffic class, instead of port level. When a queue corresponding to traffic with a particular traffic class reaches a predetermined threshold, either auto or statically set, the switch chip generates a PFC frame and sends it back to the sender. For PFC to work effectively end to end on the network, all switches and hosts in the traffic path must be configured to enable PFC, and configured for traffic class to priority mappings.
Netvisor ONE introduces a new command to configure priorities, or traffic classes, for PFC. The configuration allows you to add ports where PFC is enabled. When enabled, Netvisor ONE performs traffic class to CoS queue mappings, as well as to packet priorities, in the background. The following mappings are performed:
1 to 1 traffic class to CoS queue mapping (0 through 7)
1 to 1 packet priority (802.1p) mapping
PFC is enabled to both transmit and receive on the selected port. For transmit, Netvisor ONE pauses traffic corresponding to the traffic class indicated in the received PFC frame. For receive, Netvisor ONE generates a PFC frame when a queue corresponding to a traffic class reaches the pause threshold. Netvisor ONE auto-configures parameters such buffer threshold,and pause timer value. Disabling PFC turns off PFC for receive and transmit, although the traffic class priority and queue mappings remain.
On switches with a Broadcom Trident II chip, even with ingress admission control enabled (in lossless mode), by default, only the traffic class or priority group 7 is set up with the memory management unit (MMU) buffer resources. Packets of all priorities utilize the resources of the default priority group unless specifically configured. This implies that when enabling a new priority group for PFC, the buffer configuration is generated and saved in the chip configuration file, which is read during system initialization for MMU setup. As a result, when you enable a new priority for PFC, you must restart Netvisor ONE. Adding new ports to an existing priority group setting, for another port or ports, does not require restarting Netvisor ONE.
Up to three priority group buffer settings can be configured on switches in Netvisor ONE. If you attempt to configure more than three, Netvisor ONE returns an error message.
Prior to creating a PFC, you must run the system-setting-modify lossless-mode command, which enforces the system (nvOSd) to restart. After this process, you are not required to restart the nvOSd while creating or modifying the port PFC.
To create a new PFC configuration on port 2 with a priority group of 2, use the following command:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-create priority 2 port 1-10
 
Priority 0....7
Specify the priority for PFC setting.
port port-list
Specify the physical ports for the PFC configuration.
 
To modify the ports and change them to 11-15, use the following command:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-modify priority 2 port 11-15
Priority configuration will be effective after restart.
 
To delete the configuration, use the following command:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-delete priority 2
 
To remove a configured port, use the port-pfc-modify command. For example, if you want to remove port 12, use the command:
CLI network-admin@switch > port-pfc-modify priority 2 port 11, 13-15
To display the configuration, use the port-pfc-show command:
CLI (network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-show
switch priority port error
------- -------- ----- -----
Spine1  2 11-20      
Spine1  3 11-20      
 
Configuring Priority-based Flow Control Port Statistics
Netvisor ONE Version 2.5.4 introduced Priority-based Flow Control (PFC), but the feature implementation did not include displaying statistics related to PFC. It may be helpful to view the statistics to confirm or debug traffic characteristics when you use PFC. New commands allow you to display PFC stats per port and adjust the statistics collection.
(CLI network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-stats-clear
 
port port-list
Specify the ports to delete PFC statistics.
(CLI network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-stats-settings-modify
 
enable|disable
Specify if you want to enable or disable PFC statistics collection.
interval duration: #d#h#m#
Specify the interval between statistics collection.
disk-space disk-space-number
Specify the amount of disk space for statistics collection.
(CLI network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-stats-settings-show
 
enable|disable
Specify if you want to enable or disable PFC statistics collection.
interval duration: #d#h#m#
Specify the interval between statistics collection.
disk-space disk-space-number
Specify the amount of disk space for statistics collection.
(CLI network-admin@Spine1)>port-pfc-stats-show
time date/time: yyyy-mm-ddTHH:mm:ss
Displays the date and time for statistics collection.
start-time date/time: yyyy-mm-ddTHH:mm:ss
Displays the start date and time for statistics collection.
end-time date/time: yyyy-mm-ddTHH:mm:ss
Displays the end date and time for statistics collection.
duration duration: #d#h#m#s
Displays the duration for statistics collection.
interval duration: #d#h#m#s
Displays the interval between statistics collection.
since-start
Displays the statistics since the start time.
older-than duration: #d#h#m#s
Displays the statistics older than the specified time.
within-last duration: #d#h#m#s
Displays the statistics within a specified time.
port port-list
Displays the port list.